Rumor: LVH May Become Vegas International Casino and Hotel

At the end of 2011 Hilton decided not to renew their license with the casino that’s been known as the Las Vegas Hilton for years. The owners decided to keep continuity with the name by calling the property LVH. Well, the LVH has new owners and may have another new name next year.

Could the casino now known as the LVH wind up with the name Vegas International Casino + Hotel?

American Casino and Entertainment Properties LLC (ACEP), which applied for a trademark for the name and accompanying logo, is in the middle of the month during which outsiders can register their opposition. This standard part of the process ends Nov. 22.

Executives at ACEP, owned by an affiliate of Goldman Sachs & Co., declined to comment on what they would do with the name. “What’s in the public record is in the public record,” said spokeswoman Kathy Topp.

If you’re familiar with Vegas history you might remember that this property was called Vegas International before becoming the Hilton. Back then it was home to a guy named Elvis.He’s kind of a big deal.

Renaming the hotel Vegas International and bringing back Vegas history may help the casino find some identity and a niche with older Las Vegas vacationers. The article mentions that many of the acts already booked at LVH would make sense with this possible vintage rebranding.

If the LVH opts to adopt a version of its original International name, it would fit with an entertainment lineup heavy with acts that gray-haired guests can remember from when they were young. The current lineup includes impressionist Rich Little, the Doobie Brothers, a Rat Pack tribute group and an Elvis impersonator, reprising the hotel’s most famous headliner.

LVH is a filthy lifeless dump of a casino that offers nothing besides a large sportsbook and something to do when taking a break from the Las Vegas Convention Center.

This rebranding, along with a major deep cleaning and new ventilation, could help the casino continue to stay in business.

photo: Elvis Australia (1961 at Vegas International)

BOOM: Later Landmark

In light of the pending implosion of The HarmonVegas Inc. decided to list the Top 10 Vegas Strip Hotel implosions. I love implosions and figured this was a good excuse to visit the youtube archives.

I’ll grab video of these 10 Las Vegas Strip Hotel implosions, but we’re almost done. 🙁 We go to #2 on the list – The Landmark.

Opened: July 1, 1969

Closed: Aug. 8, 1990

Imploded: Nov. 7, 1995

In 1961, Frank Carroll purchased a vacant lot at Paradise Road and Convention Center Drive with the hope of building the Landmark. Carroll’s dream would not be completed until 1969, after a long series of mishaps.

Carroll began construction when he received a $300,000 loan from a credit union. He hired California contractors to oversee the original 15-story project, and later doubled the size to 31 stories. The tower was 365 feet tall. In 1962, after being denied additional funding from the credit union, construction stopped and the building sat empty, just 80 percent complete.

Construction resumed in 1966 after a four-year hiatus when $5.5 million was loaned to Carroll by the Teamsters Union Pension Fund. The tower was to be completed in 1967 and opened on New Year’s Eve of that year. However, Carroll once again ran out of money.

He pushed back opening date until Howard Hughes purchased the Landmark in January 1969 and agreed to pay off Carroll’s loans. The hotel opened July 1, 1969, but couldn’t break out of its financial hole.

In 1970, when Hughes left Las Vegas, control of the Landmark passed to Summa Corp., resulting in a $5.9 million loss.

The Landmark passed from owner to owner suffering further financial loss. Still, it was featured in hit movies such as “Casino” and “Diamonds are Forever,” and hosted famous entertainers, including Frank Sinatra and Elvis Presley.

After the start of the megaresort era of Las Vegas, the Landmark became too expensive to keep open and it closed Aug. 8, 1990.

The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority debated the future of the Landmark, which remained vacant in 1994. Some wanted to restore the casino and others wanted to demolish it. Those in favor of demolition won. The Landmark was imploded Nov. 7, 1995. Footage of the implosion used in the film, “Mars Attacks.” The property ended the way it began, as a vacant lot, now housing overflow parking for the Convention Center.

Destroyed In Seconds
Destroyed In Seconds